Thursday, 27 April 2017

LIL' LOST LOU - DEBUT ALBUM!

She’s like the girlfren’ of Jonathan Richman, the sister of the Stanley Brothers and the daughter of Jack White”

London-based country/rockabilly songwriter Lou Psyche alias Lil’ Lost Lou here presents her debut solo album. Not one to do things by halves, she travelled alone to Nashville to work with revered producer, songwriter and musician Billy Livsey, a man with the likes of Ronnie Lane, Kenny Rogers, Tanya Tucker and George Strait on his CV.

Setting up in the analogue Welcome To 1979 Studios (housed in a former Motown, Chess and RCA pressing plant), Livsey corralled the cream of Music City sessioneers, including bassist Dave Roe (Johnny Cash, Chet Atkins, Sturgill Simpson); pedal-steel player Russ Pahl (Glen Campbell, Patty Loveless, Kacey Musgraves); guitarist Stuart Mathis (Chris Isaak, Lucinda Williams), and drummer Justin Amaral (Junior Brown, Tommy Womack).

Let’s let Lou tell the story.... “This Nashville LP was about finishing a journey. It’s a bit more slick than my London skiffle punk/country band, but It’s still pretty raw and I think it has a great cross-cultural sound going on . I’m still so excited that these amazing guys wanted to collaborate on it.

The last song on the album, ‘Song for Bob Dylan’, I wrote 20 years ago in New York just before my dad died. I’d heard a poem by Dylan called ‘Last Thoughts On Woody Guthrie’, which said, ‘If it’s hope that you’re seeking …you’ll find it at the Grand Canyon at sundown”. Last year I finally flew back out to the USA to see the Grand Canyon. I watched the sun go down, then caught a train across America. 32 hours later I arrived in Nashville, Tennessee where I recorded that same song about the Grand Canyon that I wrote 20 years beforehand. In 12 hours we had recorded a whole album.”

Once Lou was back in the UK, finishing touches were applied to the album with the help of producer Sean Kenny at his Ten21 Studio in Maidstone.

Born and raised in Camden Town, Lou has shared stages with the likes of Wanda Jackson, Billy Childish, Pete Doherty, Wilko Johnson, The Urban Voodoo Machine and Fat White Family and sang ‘Don’t Bogart That Joint’ over the closing credits of the 2010 film Mr Nice. She plays an Epiphone Casino guitar.

"Lou attacks each song here like a train coming down the track, full-pelt!" Country Music

One of those rare finds, like finding a £20 note behind the back of your old sofa. You don't expect anything but by the end there's a big old smile on yer face!” FATEA

Of all the women haunting the secret smog filled outsider art scene in London, Lou is by far the sassiest and dirtiest of them all. A princess of a weird dark country/punk night life.” AAAmusic.com


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